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Mutual Appreciation: A Social Innovation Thinkpiece

Global trends and domestic policy have challenged Australia’s traditional owner-occupier housing model and undermined the assumption of zero housing costs in retirement that underpins both our retirement income and aged care systems. Housing has become a commodity, a place where investors grow wealth to hand down inter-generationally while others become increasingly vulnerable to housing stress.
2019

Australian Association of Gerontology Position Paper: Older women who are experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness

This Position Paper is based on the evidence presented in the Background Paper of the same name which shows that the implementation of aged care service information, assessment and delivery is not meeting the intent of the Australian aged care legislation at this stage, especially regarding older women who are experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness.
2019

Delivering equity: A new deal for pensioners who rent

This report is the third in KPMG’s series on workforce discrimination against women. It makes public policy suggestions to support an especially disadvantaged group in which women are over‑represented — those over 50 years of age who are renting privately.
2019

Why more older Australians are living in shared housing

An increasing number of older Australians are living in share housing. A relatively new group to emerge on the share-housing scene, they are choosing to share for financial reasons, but finding unexpected social benefits. Share housing across all age groups shows it’s mainly driven by financial constraints. In older age, the experience of this is gendered.
2019

Older female renters are the 'canary in the coal mine' for housing affordability

There are a growing number of Australians facing rental stress in their retirement. Home ownership rates are falling and mortgage debts are rising for many older Australians. Also, the number of private renters in the 54-64 age group is projected to increase by over 50 per cent to 567,000 in 2031. And it's getting harder for older renters to find adequate and secure housing.
2019

Improving the outcomes for older women at risk of homelessness

Older single women are the fastest growing cohort of people experiencing homelessness in Australia, though their plight remains for various reasons invisible to many. Designing solutions to this problem involves first understanding the root causes of the problem, including structural gender inequality, and then identifying the drivers of better outcomes for such women.
2019

Older Australia at a glance

Homelessness is a growing problem for older Australians, and will likely continue to increase over time due to an ageing population and declining rates of home ownership among older people. Over the last decade, the number of older homeless people increased by 49%, with the largest changes measured in people aged 65–74 and 55–64.
2018

Report Finds Sharp Rise in Older Women Experiencing Homelessness

The report, “Retiring into Poverty”, released by the National Older Women’s Housing and Homelessness Working Group, said systemic factors such as lower superannuation, unequal pay and forced time off to raise children were key factors of the increase. The combination of women having a lower overall income and housing affordability in major cities was a cause of great instability. Housing afforda
2018

More and more Australians will be homeless unless we act now

One of the most pressing challenges older Australians face is finding secure accommodation with suitable amenities. And as the numbers of older Australians grow, the pressure to provide housing that meets their needs is increasing. We may be facing a crisis of ageing homelessness in coming years. Older Australians face the same risks of falling into homelessness as everyone else.
2018

Life as an older renter and what it tells us about the urgent need for reform

It is getting harder for older renters to find adequate, appropriate and secure housing. Older women – the focus of my work – are at particular risk. This is due to longer life expectancy, lower incomes across the life course, and less access to benefits like superannuation.
2018

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