Reports

This report compares tenants rights and legislative and policy frameworks for public housing and community housing, with a focus on how these are experienced by older tenants. By foregrounding the perspectives of older tenants, this report hopes to provide insight into the personal impact of the systems that shape tenant’s housing experiences. This report also includes the experiences of housing support workers, to provide additional insight into the processes by which tenants access public and community housing.

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This report provides a brief snapshot of homelessness and the risk of homelessness for people aged 55 years and over in Tasmania.

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This report presents the findings of a study of the housing experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) older people in Victoria, undertaken by Housing for the Aged Action Group.

It aims to begin to bridge the critical gap in research by identifying the current housing circumstances and concerns of LGBTI older Victorians. We hope that the findings can be used to better inform research, policy and best practice and improve sector and policy responses surrounding older LGBTI people and Housing in order to reduce the number of LGBTI older people at risk of or experiencing homelessness.

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PDF icon Read the Final Report

Homelessness is a rapidly growing problem in Victoria. Between the 2006 and 2016 Census the number of people experiencing homelessness in Victoria increased from a rate of 35.3 per 10,000 population to 41.9 per 10,000 population. A desperate shortage of affordable housing and skyrocketing rents are driving more and more people, from diverse backgrounds, out of their homes and into homelessness.

Belying the old stereotypes of homeless people being “rough sleepers: with complex needs, the fastest growing cohorts of people becoming homeless are women and older people. For many homeless means couch sur ng, living in severe overcrowding,
and temporarily in rooming houses and emergency accommodation.

This report examines the cohort of older people, over 55 years old, who are homeless, or at risk of becoming homeless. During the same period between 2006 and 2016, older persons homelessness grew by 58 per cent. Drawing on Census, as well as Specialist Homelessness Services data from across the state, this report examines the makeup of this growing and often hidden demographic of homeless people.

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The patterns and circumstances of low income older non- homeowners identified in this report indicate that Queensland is no exception to the national trends on homelessness and the risk of homelessness for the older population. Overall homelessness in Queensland is rising and the older age groups are increasingly contributing to this growth. Unlike in other states where older people affected by homelessness and marginally housed are concentrated in
the metropolitan capital, in Queensland greater numbers are found in regional Queensland.

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Australia needs to urgently address the rapidly increasing problem facing large numbers of older people, the majority women, at risk of homelessness. As a ‘new’ cohort with many specific factors such as age, gender, first time homelessness and economic disadvantage as the cause, there is a need for uniquely tailored early intervention strategies to prevent homelessness for this group to avoid later life complexities at great cost.

This proposal recommends the introduction of a national Seniors Housing Gateway (SHG) Program at a cost of $9.6 million to urgently respond to the rapid increase of vulnerable older people at risk of homelessness and assisting them to navigate their way to a housing solution.

PDF icon Read the Seniors Housing Gateway Proposal Here

While there has been research into the experience of people living in ILUs (HAAG, 2016), there is limited knowledge of the experience of people attempting to gain access to them. It may be inferred however that access is problematic; waitlists are generally years in length, there area large numbers of low-income pensioners in the private rental market, and there are low numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) aged living in them (HAAG, 2016). Obtaining up to date and transparent information about ILUs and other retirement villages is also challenging. 

This report looks at whether HAAG clients who are given information about ILUs actually obtain housing in ILUs, and explores some of the structural reasons behind this. 

For more of the report click here

The purpose of this report is to ascertain whether or not the VHR is working as it intended in regards to the process of receiving community housing offers in the case of HAAG’s cohort of older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. HAAG’s housing workers house approximately 7 people per month in social housing - an umbrella term to mean public housing which is owned by government, and community housing which is owned or managed by not for profit community housing providers. Our workers mainly utilise the VHR and use our contacts and networks within community housing providers to house our clients. In practice though, how many of our clients are being housed in community housing through each process? Has the VHR simplified it and made the process more transparent in relation to community housing providers and how they offer vacancies? This is something the introduction of the VHR aimed to address and this report will focus on.

See the full report here

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